Few scientific explorations have captured the public’s imagination like Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to Antarctica from 1910 to 1913. He and a team of scientists withstood incredible hardships and perished before reaching home, but not before they had discovered a large number of zoological and geological specimens that greatly furthered scientific knowledge of the vast region. These included 2,109 different species of animals and plants from land and water, more than 400 of them new to science. In celebration of the 100th anniversary of their accomplishment, the Natural History Museum (Cromwell Road www.nhm.ac.uk/scott) will hold the exhibition “Scott’s Last Expedition” from Friday through Sept. 2. (via Marking an Epic Polar Journey in London - NYTimes.com)

Few scientific explorations have captured the public’s imagination like Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to Antarctica from 1910 to 1913. He and a team of scientists withstood incredible hardships and perished before reaching home, but not before they had discovered a large number of zoological and geological specimens that greatly furthered scientific knowledge of the vast region. These included 2,109 different species of animals and plants from land and water, more than 400 of them new to science. In celebration of the 100th anniversary of their accomplishment, the Natural History Museum (Cromwell Road www.nhm.ac.uk/scott) will hold the exhibition “Scott’s Last Expedition” from Friday through Sept. 2. (via Marking an Epic Polar Journey in London - NYTimes.com)

Antarctica - Photographer: Herbert Ponting 
A century before the makers of Frozen Planet, the photographer Herbert Ponting travelled with Captain Scott to Antarctica. The British Antarctica Expedition, 1910-1913, was to become a tragedy when Scott and his party died after reaching the South Pole second to their rival Roald Amundsen. Yet before they set out for the centre of the frozen continent they explored, and photographed, its spectacular sights. Ponting took powerful, touching shots of penguins, seals and the expedition’s dogs and horses. This picture – Grotto in an Iceberg – taken from an ice cave, is Ponting’s most famous shot. Scott’s ship is in the distance; Ponting, deep in the ice grotto, sees its swirling serpentine contours and ovoid aperture. It is like the frozen eye of a frost giant spying on the explorers. That frozen giant would get them. This photograph is one of the most beautiful ever taken of Antarctica, but it is forever tinged by death.
 via Freeze frame: how Herbert Ponting captured Antarctica | Art and design | guardian.co.uk

Antarctica - Photographer: Herbert Ponting 

A century before the makers of Frozen Planet, the photographer Herbert Ponting travelled with Captain Scott to Antarctica. The British Antarctica Expedition, 1910-1913, was to become a tragedy when Scott and his party died after reaching the South Pole second to their rival Roald Amundsen. Yet before they set out for the centre of the frozen continent they explored, and photographed, its spectacular sights. Ponting took powerful, touching shots of penguins, seals and the expedition’s dogs and horses. This picture – Grotto in an Iceberg – taken from an ice cave, is Ponting’s most famous shot. Scott’s ship is in the distance; Ponting, deep in the ice grotto, sees its swirling serpentine contours and ovoid aperture. It is like the frozen eye of a frost giant spying on the explorers. That frozen giant would get them. This photograph is one of the most beautiful ever taken of Antarctica, but it is forever tinged by death.

 via Freeze frame: how Herbert Ponting captured Antarctica | Art and design | guardian.co.uk